I WAS doing ok,now I'm mad

So I thought it was a good time to re introduce exercising.I went for a walk with some friends,but I think I walked to far because the top of my left leg became really painful.All I did was walk for goodness sake,anyhoo came home took pain meds and rested.
A couple of days later I helped my hubby with some painting,honestly not much,I was using a roller,now two days later my thumb pads on both hands are really sore and tender.Then I woke up this morning with aches & pains that have appeared from nowhere,does the cold weather affect PsA or is it different for everyone.

What you described sounds very similar to what a number of other people on this forum have experienced. If I do anything remotely strenuous, I know I'm going to pay for it the next couple of days. Also, I can pretty much tell when the weather is going to change. The PsA roller coaster really does suck to put it bluntly.

Its not always PsA........ The sore thighs and thumbs are the same pains people without Psa get from extended exercise (being out of shape)

I know I’m not in good shape,having had two back surgeries,after the 2nd one I was really good for 6 months,going to the gym four times a week.Then my SI joint started to be really painful,at the time I thought it was related to my surgeries as did my surgeon. I was diagnosed with PsA about 18 months ago and after trying some meds,Enbrel & Metho seem to be working hence I thought I was ok to start an exercise programme.How on earth do I get the right balance without causing so much pain?


That is the million dollar question... The biggest mistake people make when starting an exercise program is doing too much too soon. Disclaimer- I'm a certified personal trainer and have a BS in athletic training. Unfortunately, my PsA and OA have made it virtually impossible for me to exercise let alone train anyone.


Lindseylou said:

I know I'm not in good shape,having had two back surgeries,after the 2nd one I was really good for 6 months,going to the gym four times a week.Then my SI joint started to be really painful,at the time I thought it was related to my surgeries as did my surgeon. I was diagnosed with PsA about 18 months ago and after trying some meds,Enbrel & Metho seem to be working hence I thought I was ok to start an exercise programme.How on earth do I get the right balance without causing so much pain?

Totally agree,I tried swimming and I felt fine while I was in the pool so thought I’d stay in a little longer,another big mistake.I couldn’t walk later in the day,my hip was killing me.

There is good pain and bad pain. Step one is to learn to separate the two. (if you can't a consult with a good PT or certified trainer will help) Once you learn to separate the two learn to relish the good pain. Its a privilege many of us are denied. Contrary to what many say there is pain involved in getting into shape. (ask any athlete) That doesn't mean joint stuff.

Exercise causes the build up of Lactic acid which cause pain..... Its the break down of carbohydrates into glucose and with lack of oxygen hydrogen builds up. Once it build up i your muscles it take a while to get out. It happens in the blood and bypasses the liver (a good thing) There are a couple of things you can do to help. You need to do not only strength exercise but cardio as well. Also people who have suffered from chronic pain have forgotten how to breathe. Do some deep breathing exercises several times a day..... Drink lots of water (NO SPORTS DRINKS THE LAST THING YOU NEED IS MORE SUGAR AND ELECTROLYTES, you aren't sweating enough to lose them they will cause pain) cut back on your carbs and increase protein, it metabolizes differently, you don't need the extra calories or carbs. Take a few vitamin C, it makes the water more efficient at flushing out the lactic acid. As you build muscle, you will experience less of this pain. As a side advantage greater muscle mass will also help you fight the inflammation pain from PsA.

I spent a fair amount of time following my back fracture in a "chair" (after I got out of bed 6 weeks after the accident) I came to appreciate the pain. But them working out 6 -8 hours a day might do it. learn to distinguish your pain. Its virtually impossible to to cause a flare from activity (you can aggravate existing damage) but if a normal amount of activity doesn't do it, then an increased amount isn't likley aggravating damage either.

To answer your question about balance... Damned if i know. When the SI's are involved its a mess, but stretching and movement has been the best control of SI pain. There is little movement of that joint so it CAN be guarded, I use an SI belt when exercising.

When I've had to take breaks from exercising, I get back into it in short bursts, and keep an eye on the time so I don't overdo it.

I also garden, and that is not the type of thing that I am "in shape" for. So I do limited bits. I spent 20 minutes yesterday cleaning out the garden. Today I will try to get out there and ready a small bed for planting garlic. But if I find that it hurts too much to loosen the soil, I'll have my husband do it. And tomorrow I'll plant the garlic. And I may wait until the next day to mulch it. Get the picture? The heavy work is not done all in one day, and the heaviest work (loosening soil) may not be done by me at all.

I can't wait until my kids are bigger and are able to do more of the physical labor around here.

Post Exercise Pain:

Contrary to popular opinion, lactic acid is not responsible for muscle soreness- lactic acid. Rather, the muscle pain we experience after exercise is referred to as DOMS, or delayed onset muscle soreness. DOMS is believed to be caused by microscopic tearing of the muscle fibers- tips for dealing with DOMS.


tntlamb said:

There is good pain and bad pain. Step one is to learn to separate the two. (if you can't a consult with a good PT or certified trainer will help) Once you learn to separate the two learn to relish the good pain. Its a privilege many of us are denied. Contrary to what many say there is pain involved in getting into shape. (ask any athlete) That doesn't mean joint stuff.

Exercise causes the build up of Lactic acid which cause pain..... Its the break down of carbohydrates into glucose and with lack of oxygen hydrogen builds up. Once it build up i your muscles it take a while to get out. It happens in the blood and bypasses the liver (a good thing) There are a couple of things you can do to help. You need to do not only strength exercise but cardio as well. Also people who have suffered from chronic pain have forgotten how to breathe. Do some deep breathing exercises several times a day..... Drink lots of water(NO SPORTS DRINKS THE LAST THING YOU NEED IS MORE SUGAR AND ELECTROLYTES, you aren't sweating enough to lose them they will cause pain) cut back on your carbs and increase protein, it metabolizes differently, you don't need the extra calories or carbs. Take a few vitamin C, it makes the water more efficient at flushing out the lactic acid. As you build muscle, you will experience less of this pain. As a side advantage greater muscle mass will also help you fight the inflammation pain from PsA.

I spent a fair amount of time following my back fracture in a "chair" (after I got out of bed 6 weeks after the accident) I came to appreciate the pain. But them working out 6 -8 hours a day might do it. learn to distinguish your pain. Its virtually impossible to to cause a flare from activity (you can aggravate existing damage) but if a normal amount of activity doesn't do it, then an increased amount isn't likley aggravating damage either.

To answer your question about balance... Damned if i know. When the SI's are involved its a mess, but stretching and movement has been the best control of SI pain. There is little movement of that joint so it CAN be guarded, I use an SI belt when exercising.


DOMS ia absolutley true in NORMAL folk. We aren't normal. Lactic acid should be gone an hour two after exercise. HOWEVER folk with inflammatory disease have an excess of acid in their muscle which causes soreness all by it self. We have lactic acid which does cause soreness and we also have uric acid (gout) neither of which dissipate normally with inflammation.

Blood tests for both are OFTEN done with arthritis patients

There are studies going back to 1972 confirming that there are higher than normal amounts of lactic acid found in joints (and muscles) with the presence of neutrophil proteases which are the little guys that attempt to eliminate inflammation by gobbling up damages tissue.

My personal opinion when you think about it is that the reason so many of us get relief from a gluten free/low carb diet is because of the reduction of lactic (and uric) acids

BUT as you pointed out coffee, dealing with DOMS is a pretty darn good idea, if my fascination with chemistry is WAY off base.


ineedcoffee said:

Post Exercise Pain:

Contrary to popular opinion, lactic acid is not responsible for muscle soreness- lactic acid. Rather, the muscle pain we experience after exercise is referred to as DOMS, or delayed onset muscle soreness. DOMS is believed to be caused by microscopic tearing of the muscle fibers- tips for dealing with DOMS.


Very true...we are a little "Abby Normal" aren't we. Name that movie...

Your fascination with chemistry is not way off base considering we're talking theory here, and I shouldn't have made an absolute statement regarding lactic acid. Especially since most exercise research is performed on healthy individuals and not on us "abnormals".

tntlamb said:


DOMS ia absolutley true in NORMAL folk. We aren't normal. Lactic acid should be gone an hour two after exercise. HOWEVER folk with inflammatory disease have an excess of acid in their muscle which causes soreness all by it self. We have lactic acid which does cause soreness and we also have uric acid (gout) neither of which dissipate normally with inflammation.

Blood tests for both are OFTEN done with arthritis patients

There are studies going back to 1972 confirming that there are higher than normal amounts of lactic acid found in joints (and muscles) with the presence of neutrophil proteases which are the little guys that attempt to eliminate inflammation by gobbling up damages tissue.

My personal opinion when you think about it is that the reason so many of us get relief from a gluten free/low carb diet is because of the reduction of lactic (and uric) acids

BUT as you pointed out coffee, dealing with DOMS is a pretty darn good idea, if my fascination with chemistry is WAY off base.


ineedcoffee said:

Post Exercise Pain:

Contrary to popular opinion, lactic acid is not responsible for muscle soreness- lactic acid. Rather, the muscle pain we experience after exercise is referred to as DOMS, or delayed onset muscle soreness. DOMS is believed to be caused by microscopic tearing of the muscle fibers- tips for dealing with DOMS.


Start slowly but keep moving!

I love that movie.. (Young Frankenstein). and that scene is one of my favorites.. I love how Gene Wilder suspects that Igor got the wrong brain, but at first, he's all calm and collected while inquiring about the source of the brain, then slowly gets more riled, then finally goes ballistic when Igor finally reveals his mistake and starts to strangle him and making his eyes bug out even more then normal.. hehe

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yH97lImrr0Q

tickles me every time I think of that scene

ineedcoffee said:

Very true...we are a little "Abby Normal" aren't we. Name that movie...


You have to start small and keep going, twice around the block everyday, even if your sore and tired, You have to keep everything lubricated. The next week add another lap and increase speed. After a few days the soreness is less and you can increase speed, till your getting at least 30-45 minutes a day at least 5 times a week.

I can barely keep up with the 70+ yr old ladies in my "gentle waves" water exercise class. I have yet to be able to add in a 2nd day per week, because I started this fall and the weather is doing a number on me. Plus, the Arava seems to be causing a lot of muscle weakness and muscle pain. It feels different from "normal" for me. I've only been on the Arava for a few months.

The cold weather affected me like crazy! I had the same kind of issue, started walking made it two blocks before i was calling my husband to come pick me up because i couldnt imagen walking all the way back home! you will get there just one day at a time and alot slower than you would like

Sorry I gotta admit I started laughing. Its reminds me of a couple I met hiking in Glacier NP this summer. Lad y trucking along pretty good right behind was her husband with a wheel chair (not the normal thing you find on an alpine trail 7 miles from no where) So I just had to ask...... The Gentleman told me since the onset of her RA, she hasn't been able to figure out when to turn around....... (I use a cane with a stool on it for hiking which draws its fair share of looks...)

amueller said:

The cold weather affected me like crazy! I had the same kind of issue, started walking made it two blocks before i was calling my husband to come pick me up because i couldnt imagen walking all the way back home! you will get there just one day at a time and alot slower than you would like

I have the same problem. Although my PsA is undercontrol to the point where I feel ok and dont get the flares and flu feeling, I find exercising more than I normally do causes major inflammation of my tendons. I recently walked a different route that was a bit steeper than my normal and both legs and feet became swollen along the tendons and very painful. I see a physio regularly and she said the tendons were much thicker than they normally are. I had to increase my prednisone for a couple of weeks before they recovered. A short walk on the weekend on a hard surface caused a similar response with swelling of the tendons between the base of my toes. As Tnt says, the pain is different from the good- to- feel exercise soreness.

I can relate to not being able to walk far without getting hip joint pain. I know how you feel and the frustrations that go along with not being able to do what we want to do. My Rheumy keeps on telling me my hip joint pain is mechanical. I think it is PsA and next time I am going to ask how this can be verified. From time to time I have pain in the heel pads on my hands and that is usually related to a flare which shows up in my blood tests.

For me it does not have anything to do with the seasons but I live in a sub tropical climate . Keep a record of when it happens.

Be sure to discuss this with your Doctor and your Rheumy. Take it easy. We soon learn what to avoid or how much we can do. I now test myself and do things for a short time and increase gradually.

My rule of thumb: I am not the one I was before, but I can do almost anything if I DO and REST and DO and REST.I listen to my body, sit for a while, do some more, sit for a while, etc. It works for me.