Quantcast

Living with Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA)

The "F" Word... Food!

Hi –

This thread is for those of us who are using or experimenting with food as a way to improve our ability to deal with PsA. Here are a few ideas to hopefully keep the discussion happy and on track:

First, speak from your own experience - “I tried…” or “For me…” or “I’m considering…” We are all different! Hopefully that will also prevent anyone from unintentionally seeming to offer medical advice to another.

Second, if you’re asking a question about something you’ve read or heard, be super-obvious that you are looking for input and not recommending/selling anything.

Third, and most important, be nice! If someone posts an idea that you think may be a problem, go ahead and post a comment and a link to an opposing viewpoint, but operate under the idea that everyone is intelligent and wants to be as well-informed as possible. Swatting flies with sledgehammers helps no one.

Does that work? Any other ideas/suggestions?

I know some of the “veterans” on the site are tired of the topic, and if that is you I would like to very cordially invite you to move on to another thread. I appreciate your insight and experience on meds and other things I haven’t encountered yet, and hopefully putting this on the “Natural Healing” board will allow those of you who wish to spend your time on other topics to do so.

I’m headed off to work in my classroom, so will post my two cents later. I look forward to hearing from y’all. :slight_smile:

Peace.
Nicole

Alight, I am going to give it a try only in this group and see what happens. My name is Jenn and I am 30 years old. I was diagnosed with Psoriasis at age 7 in 1989. I have been dealing with pain in my joints for years, at least since 2006.. it's so hard to actually pin point when it all began.

I did go to several doctors and I was diagnosed with tendinitis repeatedly. I did PT a lot and it really did help. I have copies of all the exercises and they do help me get relief from the pain.I did aquatic aerobics for awhile and I love it too. I also tried Tai Chai and Yoga.

I am not really sure what people mean when they say they get a flare up? I get a flare up with my psoriasis on my skin but, my joints ache all the time... Some days they do hurt more, so I am guessing that is my f'are up? If I overexert myself at work or out in my garden my joints will hurt even more. I will ice them and use a heating pad too. I have a menthol muscle rub I use that is a generic for Ben Gay. I had an Orthopedic Surgeon try to "straighten" my legs by making me wear these giant hideous leg braces for 3 months. I got a 2nd opinion and found out there was nothing wrong with my legs and they did not need to be straightened. I have had an EMG done on my wrists to see if maybe I had carpel tunnel but, no my nerves are all working just fine. I also take Glucosamine Sulfate, 1000mg 2-3 times a day.

I had been on NSAIDS for a long time and they just kept upping the dosage. I ended up in severe pain with my stomach and I was diagnosed with Gastritis in 2010. Since then I have not been able to take even an ibuprofen without severe pain. I was on Nexium for a long time to heal the Gastritis and then they switched me to Prilosec daily with Zantac before meals. I also have GERD now. Recently, my doctor tried Celebrex because it is a Cox 2 inhibitor... supposedly that is going to be a little easier on the stomach than other NSAIDS but, after 4 days I had severe bloating, cramping, constipation, and it felt like someone was stabbing me in my stomach. I had a feeling like there was this empty hole in my stomach and the only thing that would make it better was eating. I went on a bland diet and stopped taking the Celebrex and it took about 2 weeks for the symptoms to go away.

I started working in my field about a year ago. I work in direct care with individuals that are developmentally disabled. I work in the group homes and I come in contact with a lot of germs on a daily basis. I have been sick a lot and they said it is normal for anyone that comes into this environment and our bodies just have to build up a strong immune system against all the germs in these homes. I am actually fighting a cold that I started on Saturday and it was horrible I had body aches, fever, coughing, sore throat... all the symptoms of a virus. I worked for the same company for a year and then I recently took on a full time position at a new company in a new group home..... So, until I stop getting sick,, I won't start taking any drugs that suppress my immune system such as DMARDS, Biologics, and Systemic drugs.

I recently found the National Psoriasis Foundation website and I have been reading everything on there. They also had a doctor do a webcast for us to watch on how to understand Psoriatic Arthritis. It was very informative! You can actually go there and watch any of the previously recorded webcasts too. You just have to make an account on there: https://www.psoriasis.org/events/webcasts

They actually did give advice on Alternative Medicine for people like me! And here is a great link to a page on their website where you can get more information too: https://www.psoriasis.org/about-psoriasis/treatments/alternative

I am working on my diet. I have done my best to try to keep out any food that are considered natural inflammatories. I have been adding into my diet foods that are natural anti-inflammatories. I really don't want to consider pumping my body with any drugs until I am in such severe pain that I am bed ridden and I can no longer work. Then, I believe I would have no other choice. But, since it is early enough, I feel I want to explore diet as an option in the beginning of all this.

Oh and I FINALLY got a call from my doctor and she is referring me to a Rhuematologist! My appointment is in September!

I forgot to mention I also eat Tumeric on some of my food.

Turmeric

TurmericThis herb is being frequently studied for its powerful anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Curcumin, the active ingredient in turmeric also has the ability to alter gene expression. A 2012 review by the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular biology highlights turmeric's ability to alter TNF cytokine expression. This is the likely reason some patients find it helpful in minimizing psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis flares. You can take turmeric concentrated in pill or supplement form or if you like curries, adding it liberally to your food. The FDA considers 1.5 to 3.0 grams of turmeric per day to be safe. However, we suggest that you consult with a naturopathic practitioner for help in determining the correct dosage for you.

Source: https://www.psoriasis.org/treating-psoriasis/complementary-and-alternative/herbal-remedies

I am, SUPER excited by this thread and will post more about myself and my f-word (love that) journey in relation to PsA soon. Thanks Nicole for starting this thread -- it definitely works for me!

Okay, here goes my story thus far...

To make a very long exposition short, by the time I had a correct diagnosis of PsA, the flare was over, but I was a mental and physical wreck. My rheumatologist suggested that I go in for a “wellness” – ha! - visit to my P.A. here in town. My P.A. shared with me the philosophy of one of her patients who has lupus: “Take care of the body, and the mind will follow.” I tweaked my diet (eat more plants!) and got back into my groove exercising, and I did feel better mentally as well as physically. Early this year when I started having morning back pain, I called my rheumatologist, got into Pilates (awesome, but that’s a different post), and made more tweaks.

Where I am right now with my eating:
- I am eating plant-heavy “flexitarian”. During the week I shoot for two servings of oily fish. Otherwise, week day meals are vegetarian because that makes me eat – drum roll, please – more vegetables. :)
- On weekends, we do eat local, pastured meat (for various reasons - again, a different post). It costs more, but since I’m saving money by not buying meat during the week it’s pretty much a wash as far as the household budget.
- We rarely eat out unless we’re on vacation. Vacations are challenging, because I love “pub grub”; my compromise is usually a big salad instead of fries with my burger, although I refuse to modify fish and chips.
- A couple of years ago I started tracking my nutrition and noticed that I have more energy and am less tempted by junk if I’m in the medium-high end of “normal” protein consumption, so now I eat an egg a day (from a colleague’s pet flock), and on the days I don’t have fish, I have nuts. My cholesterol has gone from good to obnoxiously (very low risk) good, so for me right now eggs are a good protein boost.
- I use a free online nutrition tracker and love it because I’m a geek. I don’t know if I’m allowed to name it. Lurking moderators? Anyone?
- Last spring while I was waiting to see my rheumy about my back, DH spent a couple months on the road for his job, and while he was gone I experimented with eliminating dairy and gluten. No difference. Apparently I have a steel gut. Good for me.
- Since you mentioned it, SublimeAmiga, we have always cooked from scratch, often with tons of herbs and spices of all kinds. DH is making Indian food for supper as I type this, with ginger, garlic, turmeric, hot pepper, and, as he says, “A bunch of other stuff”. :)
- The one and only “trigger” I’ve identified is Diet Mountain Dew, which was the only soda I really ever drank. It pretty much guarantees a 4 a.m. wake-up call from my back. I don’t know what ingredient it is that sets me off, but since I drink 6+ cups of green tea per day with no ill effect I’m guessing it’s not the caffeine itself, although it could be the amount.

Who knows what effect all this has on my PsA? For general wellness, though, this is what works for me right now. My current wellness goals are mostly related to fitness, but I’m sure I’ll continue to tweak what I eat to accommodate age, meds (whenever they become part of the plan), and additional information as it becomes available. I love to read about food and nutrition, and I look forward to hearing about others’ experiences and food philosophies.

Peace.
Nicole

oh I forgot to mention that I too drink lots of GREEN TEA and I add honey! :-) I love it! I also cook with a lot of different spices. I have started researching what spices benefit our health and there are quite a few that are really good!

NicoleTchr said:

Okay, here goes my story thus far...

To make a very long exposition short, by the time I had a correct diagnosis of PsA, the flare was over, but I was a mental and physical wreck. My rheumatologist suggested that I go in for a “wellness” – ha! - visit to my P.A. here in town. My P.A. shared with me the philosophy of one of her patients who has lupus: “Take care of the body, and the mind will follow.” I tweaked my diet (eat more plants!) and got back into my groove exercising, and I did feel better mentally as well as physically. Early this year when I started having morning back pain, I called my rheumatologist, got into Pilates (awesome, but that’s a different post), and made more tweaks.

Where I am right now with my eating:
- I am eating plant-heavy “flexitarian”. During the week I shoot for two servings of oily fish. Otherwise, week day meals are vegetarian because that makes me eat – drum roll, please – more vegetables. :)
- On weekends, we do eat local, pastured meat (for various reasons - again, a different post). It costs more, but since I’m saving money by not buying meat during the week it’s pretty much a wash as far as the household budget.
- We rarely eat out unless we’re on vacation. Vacations are challenging, because I love “pub grub”; my compromise is usually a big salad instead of fries with my burger, although I refuse to modify fish and chips.
- A couple of years ago I started tracking my nutrition and noticed that I have more energy and am less tempted by junk if I’m in the medium-high end of “normal” protein consumption, so now I eat an egg a day (from a colleague’s pet flock), and on the days I don’t have fish, I have nuts. My cholesterol has gone from good to obnoxiously (very low risk) good, so for me right now eggs are a good protein boost.
- I use a free online nutrition tracker and love it because I’m a geek. I don’t know if I’m allowed to name it. Lurking moderators? Anyone?
- Last spring while I was waiting to see my rheumy about my back, DH spent a couple months on the road for his job, and while he was gone I experimented with eliminating dairy and gluten. No difference. Apparently I have a steel gut. Good for me.
- Since you mentioned it, SublimeAmiga, we have always cooked from scratch, often with tons of herbs and spices of all kinds. DH is making Indian food for supper as I type this, with ginger, garlic, turmeric, hot pepper, and, as he says, “A bunch of other stuff”. :)
- The one and only “trigger” I’ve identified is Diet Mountain Dew, which was the only soda I really ever drank. It pretty much guarantees a 4 a.m. wake-up call from my back. I don’t know what ingredient it is that sets me off, but since I drink 6+ cups of green tea per day with no ill effect I’m guessing it’s not the caffeine itself, although it could be the amount.

Who knows what effect all this has on my PsA? For general wellness, though, this is what works for me right now. My current wellness goals are mostly related to fitness, but I’m sure I’ll continue to tweak what I eat to accommodate age, meds (whenever they become part of the plan), and additional information as it becomes available. I love to read about food and nutrition, and I look forward to hearing about others’ experiences and food philosophies.

Peace.
Nicole

I take my green tea plain. I think for me the added water consumption, the warmth of the cup in my hand, and the meditative aspect of sipping tea, even when I’m in front of a class, have their own benefits.

I haven't read the whole Group discussions yet, but has anyone discussed Arnica for sore joints or muscles & it's great on bruises. It has been used since the 1500's and made from a mountain daisy. I have had major Brain Surgeries and a total rebuilt C Spine, Then a removed C5 & Fused C6. I also have daily horrendous headaches and severe degenerative disc disease and am in severe constant pain. I see a pain mgmt specialist & headache specialist and many others. I have tried every medication possible and currently take many. I have also had many nerve blocks and ablation treatments. Acupuncture, Nutritional Counseling and seen an Oriental Medicine Specialist and many other healers and integrative medicine specialists. I know not everything is right for everyone all the time, but I jokingly tell people I have tried everything but the guy with the rusty knife in south america. I am always open to suggestions from anyone. You have to be true to yourself and make the best decisions for yourself. I would also recommend white tea. It's really great and has antibiotic properties, since you were talking about tea...It is incredible. Good nutrition is important for everyone. All you can do to further Natural Remedy or nutritional education is plant the seed. Then have faith it will take root where it's supposed to....We must be respective of others and true to ourselves. I know this Group works and is a positive influence to others. Has anyone discussed nightshade plants/vegetables or the anti inflammatory diet? I am sure they have but I am new here and honestly trying.

Tracy, when I was still lurking before I joined I did a lot of searches, and nightshades and anti-inflammatory diet have been discussed some, but not in this group. I’ve read a bit about them, but would welcome more information. Thanks for the tip about Arnica. I’ll check into it. Oh, and white tea is yummy - it’s one of our Sunday afternoon teas. :slight_smile: I have read that it’s like green tea but with more antioxidant because of when in the growth cycle it’s harvested.

I try my best to follow the Anti Inflammatory diet. I did post about it on another thread not in this group. There are many foods I try to buy and keep in my house so I have natural anti inflammatory choices. There are also many foods that can cause inflammation and I try my best to avoid them. It's hard to stick to this diet and I don't always follow it 100%. What can I say, I love food. :-)

A lot of people from other groups I belong to have found relief in avoiding nightshades but, I have never had a flare up(from my skin) after eating nightshades. I do however have GERD and should avoid tomatoes and green peppers but, I have no issues with potatoes.

I once met a girl that could not have anything to eat (at least it seemed that way!) because she had Celiac disease and had issues with nightshades and lactose intolerant. That must have been a very hard way to live. I have read a lot online about diet and Psoriasis.

PsA is something new to me that I have been researching. I have found a lot of great information online but, at the same time not everything is written in lay mans terms. Sometimes it's great to hear other people's stories too. I tried the Glucosamine Sulfate because someone I know has 2 sons that both have arthritis and it was so painful they couldn't walk. They started taking this and now they both can walk without pain. They don't take any other meds.

Here is some information from the girl that had such a strict diet:

"

Nightshades

Nightshades include potatoes, sweet peppers (red, yellow, orange, green) and hot peppers (bell peppers, chilli, paprika, Hungarian pepper, cayenne, Tabasco, pimento/cherry pepper, jalapeno), eggplant (aubergine), tomatoes, tomatillos, tamarios, pepinos, naranjillas, goji berries/wolfberries, mandrake, belladonna/deadly nightshade, tobacco.

Non-nightshade plants that contain solanine include apples, huckleberries, okra, artichokes, blueberries, huckleberries, ground cherries/Cape gooseberry, sugar beets and the edible flowers of petunia, chalice vine, day jasmine, angel and devil's trumpets.

It does NOT include ground white/grey/black pepper nor sweet potatoes.

Solanine is a glycoalkaloid poison found in species of the nightshade family Solanaceae. It can occur naturally in any part of the plant, including the leaves, fruit, and tubers. Solanine has fungicidal and pesticidal properties, and it is one of the plant's natural defences.

Solanine has been indicated in aggravating these conditions: osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, psoriasis, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue, gastro oesophageal reflux, cystitis, lupus, IBS, gout, scleroderma, headaches, migraine.

Interestingly nightshades were introduced only around 400 years ago into the Western diet. Other nightshades such as henbane, thorn apple (datura stramonium), belladonna and mandrake were well known but their use was restricted to specific medical applications (sedative, anaesthetic or poison) or in witchcraft.

http://thegreenchildchronicles.blogspot.com.au/2010/10/i-dont-get-i...

WHAT ARE ACETYLCHOLINESTERASE INHIBITORS?

• The chemical that transmits nerve impulses from one nerve ending to the next is acetylcholine - once it has transmitted a nerve impulse it has done its job and is no longer needed so it is broken down by an enzyme called acetylcholinesterase and recycled.

• Solanine (or tomatine from tomatoes) slows the production of this acetylcholinesterase, so acetylcholine isn't broken down as fast as it's being produced.

• Acetylcholine builds up causing a 'traffic jam' of stimulation at the receptor nerve endings.

• The nerve endings become overstimulated

• This overstimulation can lead to muscle weakness, muscle twitching, hypertension, increased intestinal contractions and increased secretions of tear, sweat, saliva, gastric and intestinal glands.

• All nightshade foods contain solanine, a strong acetylcholinesterase inhibitor. "



She also posted this... it's very long... I'm sorry!! But I did read it and there some valuable information:

"

With global information so readily available, we boomers now have the opportunity to educate ourselves, and others, in natural options for both reversal and prevention of these life-altering and life-threatening disorders. After all, we are just now entering the new mid-life! Foods that Cripple Most individuals have never heard the term "nightshades," much less make the connection to a food group that ignites pain and inflammation. Nightshades are a botanical group known as solanaceae - making up over 92 varieties and 2,000 species. The connection of nightshades and arthritis-type disorders was brought to the forefront largely by the efforts of Dr. Norman F. Childers, former Professor of Horticulture at Rutgers University. Dr. Childers knew first-hand the effects of severe joint pain and stiffness. He discovered that after consuming a meal containing any tomatoes, he experienced severe pain. As his interest in the inflammatory responses to nightshades grew, he observed livestock kneeling in pain from inflamed joints - the livestock had consumed weeds containing a substance called solanine. Solanine is a chemical known as an alkaloid, which can be highly toxic. Flexing our Muscles An enzyme present in the body called Cholinesterase originates in the brain where its responsible for flexibility of muscle movement. Solanine, present in nightshades, is a powerful inhibitor of cholinesterase. In other words, its presence can interfere with muscle function - the cause of stiffness experienced after consuming nightshades. All people are not sensitive to nightshades in the same degree. Research has proved that when an inflammatory condition exists, consuming nightshades is like adding "fuel to the fire". That said, there is no scientific evidence that for those not afflicted with inflammation that nightshades will cause it. Experience Matters Dr. Childers, through his research, proved that 74 - 90% of people who ache and hurt, regardless of their diagnostic "label," have a sensitivity to nightshades. Potatoes, one of the nightshades, especially those stored improperly or aged, have been known to cause toxic symptoms severe enough to require hospitalization - symptoms range from gastrointestinal and general inflammation, nausea, diarrhoea, and dizziness to migraines. It is believed the reason for the toxicity in potatoes is the presence of solanine in and around the green patches and the eyes that have sprouted. Nightshade Quick Reference

Tomatoes, all varieties (including Tomatillos) · Potatoes, all varieties (sweet potatoes and yams are NOT nightshades. Beware of potato starch used in many seasonings and as a thickening agent) · Peppers (red, green, yellow, orange, jalapeno, chilli, cayenne, pimento) · Paprika · Eggplant

Foods that contain solanine although not directly in the nightshade family: Blueberries & Huckleberries Okra Artichokes Other Substances to Avoid: Homeopathic remedies containing Belladonna (known as deadly nightshade) · Prescription and over-the-counter medications containing potato starch as a filler (especially prevalent in sleeping and muscle relaxing meds) · Edible flowers: petunia, chalice vine, day jasmine, angel and devil's trumpets. · Atropine and Scopolamine, used in sleeping pills · Topical medications for pain and inflammation containing capsicum (in cayenne pepper) *Read labels carefully because you could be doing everything else right, and still be sabotaged by one small amount of an ingredient such as paprika as a garnish. Uncommon Solution for Common Ailments For the millions of North Americans experiencing some form of joint, tendon, ligament, bone or soft-tissue discomfort, the goal is not only to find a natural solution for short-term relief, but also to make the dietary changes necessary to eliminate and reverse the condition, specifically for: Tendonitis Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Bursitis Fibromyalgia (ME, Fibro myositis) Arthritis (Osteo and Rheumatoid) Gout Heart Disease Digestive Disorders (leaky gut, irritable bowel, Cohn’s, etc.) Any condition whose symptoms include persistent aches, tenderness, swelling, pain, numbness, tingling, muscle weakness and inflammation. Defeat Pain and Inflammation, Naturally I've consulted with hundreds of clients with gastrointestinal and inflammatory disorders who resist eliminating nightshades, even for an initial trial period of 90 days, the time necessary to experience the benefit. Those that do, however, report the amazing improvement in symptoms of fibromyalgia/me, chronic fatigue, headaches, arthritis, gout, carpal tunnel, irritable bowel and scleroderma, to name a few - why not try it, after all, the only thing you have to lose is your discomfort, isn't that what matters? Dr Gloria Gilbère, ND, DA Hom, PhD."

Wonderful topic!

I think the amount of impact diet has on PsA depends on a lot of factors. We believe I've had PsA since I was four years old, although I wasn't diagnosed until I was 36. When I was 17/18 I had a massive flare, ended up having lots of difficulty walking, tendonitis, carpal tunnel, back issues, neck issues, and the list goes on. It was also around that time that I developed an eating disorder, which actually greatly improved my joint health. I was eating only rice and vegetables, when I was eating, so my celiac (which I wasn't diagnosed with until age 36 as well) went into remission, and I believe so did my PsA. Well, after a massive flare while I was detoxing.

Then I went to college, started dealing with my eating disorder, and changed my diet ... and immediately started having joint issues again, even though I didn't reintroduce gluten until years later.


Fast-forward to my pregnancies with my 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 5th children ... they were the only times in my adult life when I felt energetic and "normal." I believe my PsA went into remission then as well, as can happen with autoimmune disorders during pregnancy. Three months or so after birthing my fifth child, my joint issues came back with a vengeance. Three years later, I got my PsA and celiac diagnoses. I was already eating quite healthy, but then removed gluten and inflammatory foods from my diet, hoping it would help a great deal. Unfortunately, it hasn't helped anything except perhaps my energy levels. My PsA / AS continues to be very aggressive, needing treatment with a biologic.

I've continued with the dietary changes, as I feel being the healthiest I can be while living with PsA is essential. It's been suggested to me by a nutritionist that perhaps my dietary changes weren't has helpful as I'd hoped since my body was healing itself from the damage caused by Celiac.

So I guess I've had two different experiences with diet and PsA, although I'm wondering how much worse I'd feel if I weren't eating as "clean" as I try to eat. :)

This looks really great! Food is my greatest challenge. Mostly the buying of, the storage of, what not to eat....the list is soooo long but what to eat in place of the "not to eat" list. Food is the most important thing I want to learn about to get healthy and alleviate the ongoing pain and inflammation.

Found a new F word to research! PRUNES! http://www.expertclinic.org/Benefits-Of-Prunes.html

Health Benefits of Prunes

Prunes are plums that have been dehydrated to preserve its nutrients longer. There are several health benefits of prunes, which provide excellent sources of fiber, vitamins and minerals and likewise help in the improvement of general wellbeing.

Prunes are dried plums which are basically sweet, chewy, sticky and highly nutritious especially if it has no preservatives. Plums are dehydrated for the purpose preserving all its nutrients at a much longer time. There are therefore numerous health benefits of prunes.

Nutrition and Health Benefits of Prunes

Fiber

Prunes are excellent sources of dietary fiber. It has both soluble and insoluble fiber, which is equally important in digestion, constipation, lowering the risk of colon cancer and in regulating the level of cholesterol and blood sugar in the body.

Soluble fiber when consumed forms into a gel which blocks absorption of cholesterol and helps stabilize the level of blood sugar. The insoluble type of fiber aids in bowel movement as it softens the stool thereby preventing constipation and likewise helps promote healthy maintenance of the colon.

Moreover, the dietary fiber in prunes keeps the stomach feeling full thereby aids in weight loss as well as weight control. It is however important to keep a count of calorie intake when losing weight as prunes contain a significant amount of calories (3 oz. = 205 calories).

Potassium

Prunes contain high potassium level necessary in maintaining a normal level of blood pressure and therefore lower the risk of heart disease. Potassium helps as well in the absorption of calcium necessary in nourishing the bones.

Antioxidants

Prunes contain high amount of antioxidants, which are necessary in eliminating free radicals that harm the fat cells. Fat cells are vital in the development of the brain cells in particular. Moreover, prunes have high level of vitamin A and beta-carotene, an added source of antioxidant.

Due to the rich content of antioxidants, prunes were found to aid in the prevention of various diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis, heart disease brought about by diabetes, asthma and colon cancer.

Carbohydrates

Prunes are good source of energy as it contains a substantial amount of carbohydrates but have low glycemic index (GI) due to its rich fiber content. The GI measures how food that contains carbohydrates raises the level of blood sugar.

Foods with high GI can cause a surge in blood sugar level giving the body a sudden boost of energy and is quickly followed by a sharp drop in blood sugar hence a drop in energy level. On the other hand, foods with low GI such as prunes cause a slow rise in the level of blood sugar thereby providing a steady rate of release of energy.

Vitamin C

The rich content of vitamin C in prunes helps in the absorption of iron in the body, which is crucial in the formation of RBC (red blood cells).

Vitamin A

Another health benefit of prunes is the rich content of vitamin A also known as retinol. Vitamin A provides nourishment to the retina thereby helps in promoting good vision. It also helps in maintaining a healthy skin.

Vitamin B6

Vitamin B6 is beneficial in preventing cardiovascular diseases. It helps the body metabolize proteins and fats as well as process carbohydrates. Vitamin B6 also plays a crucial role in fertility and hormonal balance. A single cup serving of prunes provides 49% RDA of this vitamin.

Iron

Prunes help increase absorption of iron in the body, which is vital in red blood cells formation. Iron helps transport oxygen throughout the body.

Pectin

The rich amount of fiber in prunes is attributable to its carbohydrate content called pectin. As such, it helps in lowering the level of blood cholesterol. Daily consumption of 100g of prunes reduces total cholesterol level as per the findings of researchers at the University of California. Researchers also find that California Dried Plums helped reduce cholesterol and lowered the risk for cardiovascular disease.

Other Nutrients

Other health benefits found in prunes are various minerals such as copper, calcium, phosphorus and magnesium as well as various vitamins like thiamine, riboflavin, folate, niacin, panthotenic acid and vitamin b complex.

Other Health Benefits of California Prunes

Mental health

It is a given fact that the food eaten affects the physical health and there are evidences that show that it likewise affects the mental health as well as the general wellbeing and mood of a person.

To ensure a good physical and mental health, one should eat a balanced diet, which includes sufficient quantity of essential fats, complex carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals, protein and water.

California prunes therefore are an ideal snack because of its various health benefits. A balanced diet, which includes prunes along with raw vegetables, nuts, whole grains, oily fish, lean meat and other fruits, will help promote mental, emotional and physical wellbeing.

Dental health

Researchers reveal that prunes are safe to snack on, as it does not reduce the plaque pH to critical level. It does not therefore raise any risk of tooth decay or cavities.

So you see, you can enjoy not only the delicious taste but also the health benefits of prunes, especially when taken regularly as part of a well balanced diet.

Hi Amiga,

I also take tumeric capsules and read that is difficult for the body to absorb tumeric so it's best to take it on an empty stomach and with ginger to help the absorption. You can also boil tumeric and drink it for even better absorption, but I'm not willing to do that :-)

SublimeAmiga said:

I forgot to mention I also eat Tumeric on some of my food.

Turmeric

TurmericThis herb is being frequently studied for its powerful anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Curcumin, the active ingredient in turmeric also has the ability to alter gene expression. A 2012 review by the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular biology highlights turmeric's ability to alter TNF cytokine expression. This is the likely reason some patients find it helpful in minimizing psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis flares. You can take turmeric concentrated in pill or supplement form or if you like curries, adding it liberally to your food. The FDA considers 1.5 to 3.0 grams of turmeric per day to be safe. However, we suggest that you consult with a naturopathic practitioner for help in determining the correct dosage for you.

Source: https://www.psoriasis.org/treating-psoriasis/complementary-and-alte...

I didn’t find the meds, just the spice at the grocery store, I add it to everything I cook :slight_smile:

I order tumeric capsules from an online vitamin store. And I keep a bottle of tumeric capsules on my bedside table so that I remember to take it in the morning on an empty stomach to help the absorption.

Hi Tracy-

I've used a homeopathic arnica in tincture and salve form for about 20 years. It can also be taken by mouth but needs to be properly dosed first. I used to have my own small apothecary and worked for a homeopathic MD long ago.

Homeopathy was around long before allopathic (traditional) medicine. The philosophy that "like cures like" is the main building block behind homeopathic medicine.

Here's an excerpt from The Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine article called: A Brief History of Homeopathy

There were homeopathic hospitals in Britain One of the first institutions devoted to homeopathy was the American Institute of Homeopathy, founded at the end of the nineteenth century, when it seems that ‘a rapprochement between homeopaths and conventional physicians gradually unfolded. Homeopaths adopted new orthodox treatments... while allopaths [regular orthodox physicians] borrowed homeopathic remedies... In 1903, after long antagonism, the American Medical Association... invited homeopaths to join [the Association].’9 The Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act of 1939 in the USA allowed homeopathic medicines to be sold openly on the market. Five homeopathic hospitals were founded in Britain, the two largest (in London and Glasgow) having in-patient units. Today the ten most common diseases treated by homeopaths are (in order of frequency) asthma, depression, otitis media, allergic rhinitis (hay fever), headache and migraine, neurotic disorders, non-specific allergy, dermatitis, arthritis and hypertension.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1676328/

I was thrilled to eventually see more and more mainstream stores carried homeopathic products and remedies in recent years.

I still use a number of my old stand bys: hypericum, arnica, ferrum phos, oscillococcinum and others as needed.

I like to mix my arnica tincture w/aloe vera straight from the plant -- it's both cooling and soothing at the same time.


Tracy Z. said:

I haven't read the whole Group discussions yet, but has anyone discussed Arnica for sore joints or muscles & it's great on bruises. It has been used since the 1500's and made from a mountain daisy. I have had major Brain Surgeries and a total rebuilt C Spine, Then a removed C5 & Fused C6. I also have daily horrendous headaches and severe degenerative disc disease and am in severe constant pain. I see a pain mgmt specialist & headache specialist and many others. I have tried every medication possible and currently take many. I have also had many nerve blocks and ablation treatments. Acupuncture, Nutritional Counseling and seen an Oriental Medicine Specialist and many other healers and integrative medicine specialists. I know not everything is right for everyone all the time, but I jokingly tell people I have tried everything but the guy with the rusty knife in south america. I am always open to suggestions from anyone. You have to be true to yourself and make the best decisions for yourself. I would also recommend white tea. It's really great and has antibiotic properties, since you were talking about tea...It is incredible. Good nutrition is important for everyone. All you can do to further Natural Remedy or nutritional education is plant the seed. Then have faith it will take root where it's supposed to....We must be respective of others and true to ourselves. I know this Group works and is a positive influence to others. Has anyone discussed nightshade plants/vegetables or the anti inflammatory diet? I am sure they have but I am new here and honestly trying.

Can you please explain how you make the arnica salve - i'm very interested in trying it. Thanks !!!

Thanks for bringing up this topic.

I'm still working on the food issue. I've been wondering if eating too much salt affects my pain and swelling but don't have anything concrete yet. I'm trying to keep my intake of gluten and caffeine down too but I'm not sure if it really makes a difference. I had been trying to keep notes on it but my hands were so bad that I had trouble writing...so I gave it up for a while.

I am open to anything that might help. I think everyone's body reacts differently and each person has to find what works for them.

I haven't been able to try any of the restrictions people have mentioned but it seems like a lot of people have made diet adjustments but don't talk about it much. I've always cooked from scratch so processed food shouldn't be a factor for me.

When i have a "strain" feeling which to me means the PsA is moving in ...starting to affect the tendons...i use a product called Doctor's Pain Formula. It contains willow bark which is a natural source similar to aspirin. It's a topical cream.

I am eating more veggies and fruit...lots of orange juice, bananas, berries etc. I don't eat a lot of red meat. Green tea yes but it has so much caffeine in it. Honey and lemon are good too. Once my most recent flare which has been the last 6 months is under control, I'll be able to tell if any changes I make in my diet work. I still haven't been able to get my exercise routine back since I can't jog anymore. PsA in hands and feet make it difficult.

I love Caffeine, I did a lot of research on it and never found it affected Psoriatic Arthritis. Green tea has about 24-40mg of caffeine and coffee can have anywhere from 95-200mg of caffeine.

I might look into getting something with Willow Bark! Sounds like good stuff! :-) I use a lot of menthol things like Salonpas Patches and Bengay cream..

I also have trouble writing, I get shooting pains in my thumb and into my wrist.

I have never really been a jogger, my knees are really bad and concrete is terrible for knee joints... it is much easier on your joints if you walk briskly :)

Dini said:

Thanks for bringing up this topic.

I'm still working on the food issue. I've been wondering if eating too much salt affects my pain and swelling but don't have anything concrete yet. I'm trying to keep my intake of gluten and caffeine down too but I'm not sure if it really makes a difference. I had been trying to keep notes on it but my hands were so bad that I had trouble writing...so I gave it up for a while.

I am open to anything that might help. I think everyone's body reacts differently and each person has to find what works for them.

I haven't been able to try any of the restrictions people have mentioned but it seems like a lot of people have made diet adjustments but don't talk about it much. I've always cooked from scratch so processed food shouldn't be a factor for me.

When i have a "strain" feeling which to me means the PsA is moving in ...starting to affect the tendons...i use a product called Doctor's Pain Formula. It contains willow bark which is a natural source similar to aspirin. It's a topical cream.

I am eating more veggies and fruit...lots of orange juice, bananas, berries etc. I don't eat a lot of red meat. Green tea yes but it has so much caffeine in it. Honey and lemon are good too. Once my most recent flare which has been the last 6 months is under control, I'll be able to tell if any changes I make in my diet work. I still haven't been able to get my exercise routine back since I can't jog anymore. PsA in hands and feet make it difficult.